Walking & Cycling Routes

Bicycle-friendly bridleways and quiet country roads circle Seaton. The seafront roundabout – nicknamed the ‘Pedal-about’ – is surrounded by brightly painted retired bicycles, and Seaton has a velo café, the Broom Wagon.

The Axe Valley Pedallers are based here, and weekly rides take place for roadies and mountain bikers each Thursday evening (leaving the Kings Arms from 6.30pm) and on many weekends. All fitness and skill levels are catered for and new riders are always welcome.

Seaton features on several national cycling trails, including Sustrans’ epic coast- hugging Route 2, from Dover to Cornwall. The still-in-development Route 33 – known as the ‘Stop Line Way‘, because it traces a historic wartime defence line – begins in Bristol and finishes in Seaton. The town also appears on the South Devon Cycle Map .

Mountain bikers can explore bridleways and off-road tracks, including trails at nearby Morganhayes.

A walk along the Seaton seafront, from the red cliffs at the harbour-end of the beach to the towering chalky white walls at Seaton Hole, is a time-travelling stroll through 185 million years of natural history. This is the only place in the world where you can see evidence of three geological periods – the Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous – in one place, so look out for fossils en route.

A major hub on the world-famous South West Coast Path – a long-distance walking route around the coasts of Dorset, Devon, Cornwall and Somerset – Seaton has lots of walker-friendly accommodation and facilities for hikers to stock up on supplies.

But there are many shorter walking tracks to be explored around the town and its immediate surrounds too, from paths leading through the Seaton Wetlands that frame the riverbank to tree-lined trails wending through ancient woodlands like Holyford Woods and historic sites such as the Iron-age hillfort at Blackbury Camp.